Interesting Dual Boot Problems

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Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2
Hello,

I installed Windows 10 recently, and now I am having wifi issues. On
the Windows side, the campus wifi will connect, but it will show that
there is no internet connection. Booting in to Linux causes pings to
fail with temporary failure in host resolution, and ip link shows that
the wifi device is down. Doing sudo ip link set dev wlp3s0 up has no
effect; from what I can tell, it is stuck in a permenant down state.
dmesg reports that the "link is not ready". I've tried restarting the
netctl profile for the campus network, restarting dhcp, resetting the
pci device, but alas, things seem to be very broken. I am using a
Killer n1525 network card. Has anyone else had a similar issue, and if
so, how did you resolve it?

Thanks,

Hunter
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2


On 10/04/18 10:45, Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I installed Windows 10 recently, and now I am having wifi issues. On
> the Windows side, the campus wifi will connect, but it will show that
> there is no internet connection. Booting in to Linux causes pings to
> fail with temporary failure in host resolution, and ip link shows that
> the wifi device is down. Doing sudo ip link set dev wlp3s0 up has no
> effect; from what I can tell, it is stuck in a permenant down state.
> dmesg reports that the "link is not ready". I've tried restarting the
> netctl profile for the campus network, restarting dhcp, resetting the
> pci device, but alas, things seem to be very broken. I am using a
> Killer n1525 network card. Has anyone else had a similar issue, and if
> so, how did you resolve it?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Hunter
Campus wifi is usually wpa enterprise which I've always had trouble
with. I don't know how installing windows could cause this or how to fix
this but I would recommend trying to connect to a normal wpa2 network
and see if that is broken too.

A mobile hotspot should suffice if you're living on campus with no
access to a home network.
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

Bennett Piater


On 04/10/2018 12:10 PM, morganamilo via arch-general wrote:

>
>
> On 10/04/18 10:45, Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general wrote:
> Campus wifi is usually wpa enterprise which I've always had trouble
> with. I don't know how installing windows could cause this or how to fix
> this but I would recommend trying to connect to a normal wpa2 network
> and see if that is broken too.
>
> A mobile hotspot should suffice if you're living on campus with no
> access to a home network.

eduroam and other wpa2-enterprise work for me.
Do you have a means to try your config with another laptop/network card?

--
GPG fingerprint: 871F 1047 7DB3 DDED 5FC4 47B2 26C7 E577 EF96 7808
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2
On 4/10/18, Bennett Piater <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
> On 04/10/2018 12:10 PM, morganamilo via arch-general wrote:
>>
>>
>> On 10/04/18 10:45, Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general wrote:
>> Campus wifi is usually wpa enterprise which I've always had trouble
>> with. I don't know how installing windows could cause this or how to fix
>> this but I would recommend trying to connect to a normal wpa2 network
>> and see if that is broken too.
>>
>> A mobile hotspot should suffice if you're living on campus with no
>> access to a home network.
>
> eduroam and other wpa2-enterprise work for me.
> Do you have a means to try your config with another laptop/network card?
>
> --
> GPG fingerprint: 871F 1047 7DB3 DDED 5FC4 47B2 26C7 E577 EF96 7808
>
I do not have a spare laptop or network card. Everything was working
perfectly fine before I installed Windows, so I have no idea what is
going on here.
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

Bennett Piater


On 04/10/2018 12:44 PM, Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general wrote:
> I do not have a spare laptop or network card. Everything was working
> perfectly fine before I installed Windows, so I have no idea what is
> going on here.

Interesting. Maybe windows turned something off? Broken power saving
feature that turned off something in the card maybe?

--
GPG fingerprint: 871F 1047 7DB3 DDED 5FC4 47B2 26C7 E577 EF96 7808
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2
On 4/10/18, Bennett Piater <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
>
> On 04/10/2018 12:44 PM, Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general wrote:
>> I do not have a spare laptop or network card. Everything was working
>> perfectly fine before I installed Windows, so I have no idea what is
>> going on here.
>
> Interesting. Maybe windows turned something off? Broken power saving
> feature that turned off something in the card maybe?
>
> --
> GPG fingerprint: 871F 1047 7DB3 DDED 5FC4 47B2 26C7 E577 EF96 7808
>
This could be the case. The only option under power management for the
network card is "Allow the Computer to Turn off the Card to Save
Power", which was turned on by default; I turned that off to no effect
on the Arch side.
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2
>>> I do not have a spare laptop or network card. Everything was working
>>> perfectly fine before I installed Windows, so I have no idea what is
>>> going on here.
>>
>> Interesting. Maybe windows turned something off? Broken power saving
>> feature that turned off something in the card maybe?

What does "rfkill -list" say? Some Win driver soft block the wifi card
upon restart/shutdown.
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2
Nothing is being soft blocked when I ran rfkill this afternoon. A
second reboot still shows the same result.

On 4/10/18, Marco via arch-general <[hidden email]> wrote:

>>>> I do not have a spare laptop or network card. Everything was working
>>>> perfectly fine before I installed Windows, so I have no idea what is
>>>> going on here.
>>>
>>> Interesting. Maybe windows turned something off? Broken power saving
>>> feature that turned off something in the card maybe?
>
> What does "rfkill -list" say? Some Win driver soft block the wifi card
> upon restart/shutdown.
>
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2
Just a thought: Maybe windows changed some BIOS/UEFI setting without
asking you triggering a power management or similar bug?


On 10.04.2018 19:46, Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general wrote:

> Nothing is being soft blocked when I ran rfkill this afternoon. A
> second reboot still shows the same result.
>
> On 4/10/18, Marco via arch-general <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>>> I do not have a spare laptop or network card. Everything was working
>>>>> perfectly fine before I installed Windows, so I have no idea what is
>>>>> going on here.
>>>> Interesting. Maybe windows turned something off? Broken power saving
>>>> feature that turned off something in the card maybe?
>> What does "rfkill -list" say? Some Win driver soft block the wifi card
>> upon restart/shutdown.
>>
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2
In reply to this post by arch general mailing list-2
Op di 10 apr. 2018 19:46 schreef Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general <
[hidden email]>:

> Nothing is being soft blocked when I ran rfkill this afternoon. A
> second reboot still shows the same result.
>

Does it make a difference if you choose reboot in Windows vs shutdown?

Windows 10 hibernates by default (hybrid shutdown) when powering off.
Reboot uses a 'real' shutdown.



Mvg, Guus Snijders
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

arch general mailing list-2
On 4/10/18, Guus Snijders via arch-general <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Op di 10 apr. 2018 19:46 schreef Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general <
> [hidden email]>:
>
>> Nothing is being soft blocked when I ran rfkill this afternoon. A
>> second reboot still shows the same result.
>>
>
> Does it make a difference if you choose reboot in Windows vs shutdown?
>
> Windows 10 hibernates by default (hybrid shutdown) when powering off.
> Reboot uses a 'real' shutdown.
>
>
>
> Mvg, Guus Snijders
>
No. Rebooting from Windows to Linux still causes the issue. Rebooting
from Linux to Linux causes the issue, and shutting down the system
doesn't help either.
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

David C. Rankin
On 04/10/2018 03:31 PM, Hunter Jozwiak via arch-general wrote:

>> Does it make a difference if you choose reboot in Windows vs shutdown?
>>
>> Windows 10 hibernates by default (hybrid shutdown) when powering off.
>> Reboot uses a 'real' shutdown.
>>
>>
>>
>> Mvg, Guus Snijders
>>
> No. Rebooting from Windows to Linux still causes the issue. Rebooting
> from Linux to Linux causes the issue, and shutting down the system
> doesn't help either.

This is a really important issue with Win10 -- especially with dual-boot.
Unless you choose "Restart", Win10 doesn't fully shutdown. The windows driver
could leave the card in a state that Linux cannot manage the card. One option
is to use the button or switch on your laptop to turn wifi off before using
"Restart" and then turn it back on once the cold-boot occurs. I have an HP
Laptop that is a dual-boot Arch/Win10 box (it has 2 separate hard drives) and
I haven't experienced this problem with an Intel wireless chipset.

Those are the only stray thoughts I have on the issue. If a cold-boot is
occurring when switching between OSs, then neither can have any effect on the
other (at least with a MBR setup).

--
David C. Rankin, J.D.,P.E.
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Re: Interesting Dual Boot Problems

LoneVVolf
On 11-04-18 18:32, David C. Rankin wrote:
> Those are the only stray thoughts I have on the issue. If a cold-boot is
> occurring when switching between OSs, then neither can have any effect on the
> other (at least with a MBR setup).

Manufacturer windows driver can turn off network card using proprietary
functions.
Linux is unable to undo that.

That setting is hidden in device manager , device , driver details or
similar.
Not sure where that can be found in win10, but changing it there is only
way to be sure it's disabled.
Higher level options to set it are usually only temporarily.